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Gun Collecting: The British .303 Jungle Carbine

Gun Collecting: The British .303 Jungle Carbine/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f3765bc8ecb3_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f3765bc8ecb3_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The .303 British Jungle Carbine. The English Lee-Enfield series of rifles is really a castoff design the Americans didn’t want. Back in the 1880s, American inventor James Paris Lee took a design that had failed to catch much attention in the U.S. over to Great Britain. The British adopted the design and shortly were cranking out thousands of the rifles using Lee’s action modified to fire the .303 British cartridge and a 10-round magazine. The final design work was done at the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield, so the rifle has forever been linked with the name where it was engineered. The history of the design and use of each model of the Enfield series would take up much more room than I have in this column. In this month’s Collector’s Corner I shall discuss one of the final variations of the Enfield series, the rifle No. 5 Mk. 1. The Lee-Enfield Rifle No. 5 Mk. 1 is usually known as the “Jungle Carbine.” Although that was always a nickname for the model, it was never called a Jungle Carbine in official terminology. In late 1942 the British Infantry Weapons Development committee began research on a shorter and lighter version of the standard-issue rifle, the No. 4 Mk.1. It was intended for use mainly in the Far East where jungle fighting in difficult terrain had shown the full-sized SMLE and No.4 Mk.1 rifles to be too large and heavy. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles New Gun: Ruger's Pistol-Caliber PC Carbine Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling Through much of 1943 various design features were submitted and the final result was the carbine we know today. During its design stage the rifle was referred to as a “No. 4 lightened rifle”. On March 21, 1944 the finalized design of the new rifle was approved. On Sept 12, 1944 the name of this model was officially changed to Rifle, No. 5 Mk. 1. The features unique to the No. 5 Mk. 1 rifle are: The action is the same as the No.4 but has been lightened by removing steel in some areas. The 20.5 inch barrel includes a pinned-on flash eliminator. The rear sight is graduated to 800 yards, instead of the 1300-yard sight found on No.4 rifles. The butt stock has a rubber recoil pad Production of the new rifle began at the Royal Ordnance Factories at Fazakerly and BSA Shirley. Although several thousand No. 5 rifles were made before WWII ended in August 1945, the design did not see a lot of combat use during the war. Production of the No. 5 rifle continued after the war. The rifle was popular with troops because it was shorter and lighter than other models. There were however continuing complaints that the rifle could not shoot with consistent accuracy. The ordnance officials called this problem “wandering zero.” It seems rifles calibrated at the arsenal or in the field would shoot acceptably for a while then become increasingly inaccurate. There were several attempts to determine if there was a design defect that caused this problem but they never settled on a single cause. A significant factor in the lack of accuracy is apparently the flash hider. In tests of rifles without it they held the accuracy for more shots. But that was one contributing factor, not the cause. Other things that might factor in are the length of the fore stock, lightning cuts on the receiver and barrel, and methods of holding the barreled action in the wood.

Whats a Duffle Bag Cut? GI Rifle Bring Backs

Whats a Duffle Bag Cut? GI Rifle Bring Backs

by Hognose It never occurred to us until recently that there were people in the gun culture unfamiliar with the Duffle Bag Cut, until a knowledgeable young gun guy asked us, “What’s a Duffle Bag Cut?” as we described such a cut on a Mauser that Santa brought us this year. Some of the WeaponsMan related Christmas stuff, posing at the tree. The cut doesn’t show with the rifle at rest. Thing is, if you grew up in collecting in the 50s, 60s or 70s, many WWI and WWII vintage long guns had this cut, and everybody knew why. Rear side of the cut, which was done with the stock off the gun. The dual sling swivels (left side for cavalry, bottom for infantry) was often seen on Czech long arms like this early 7.92 mm vz.24. But circumstances have changed, a lot. The military, especially the military police and the judge advocates, have fallen under the sway of gun control activists, and the guys are no longer permitted to take and keep war trophies. Taking an enemy firearm as a trophy was widespread (and even encouraged, or at least permitted) in World War I and II and the Korean War. It came under some restrictions in Vietnam, and by the GWOT was totally and utterly banned. Here’s the nose end of the cut. It looks like it was ineffectually (WECSOG?) glued in the past. But during its heyday in the 20th Century, war trophy taking was a norm. The weapons were brought back by the frontline troops who took them, the rear-echelon troops who traded for them, and the MPs who confiscated them for their own personal benefit, which was definitely a thing, if you listened to the WWII guys when they were still around to talk. There was a problem, though. A Mauser or Arisaka didn’t fit in a GI duffel bag (and often, all a troop had for luggage was a duffle bag and a field pack). Enter the Duffle Bag Cut. Someone would cut the stock where the cut would be hidden by the barrel band. This WWII bringback in a genuine WWII duffle bag (late Great Uncle Ovide’s) shows how the cut made it possible to close the bag on a disassembled Mauser, where even the bare stock would have been several inches too long. . A permanent alteration to a firearm usually gets collectors all wound up, but this cut now a 70-year-old marker, an authentic part of the gun’s history and the tale it would tell if it could talk. Under the barrel band, it doesn’t hurt the utility of the gun for display, and so few collectors would consider repairing the cut (although any gunsmith not of the Wile E. Coyote School of Gunsmithing could). Those WWII soldiers who brought back Mausers and Arisakas, etc., were looking to keep them as trophies, or have them sporterized as deer guns, and the last few inches of the wood was not of any use on a sporting rifle. Duffle Bag Cut should not be seen on a gun with import marks. Instead, it’s the second-best indicator (after military capture or bringback papers) of a GI bringback. And it’s just one more interesting little thing about our Christmas VZ.24 Mauser. This post first appeared at weaponsman.com

2020 Review: Best Mossberg 500 Recoil Pads

2020 Review: Best Mossberg 500 Recoil Pads

Finding the best Mossberg 500 recoil pad can be a challenge, but you'll be able to find one if you know what to look for and what makes a recoil pad great compared to the lower quality, cheap recoil pads that currently flood the market. To save you time, money, and hopefully headaches, we've hand-picked five of the best recoil pads for the Mossberg 500. Each of these has the purpose of reducing recoil each time you take a shot. The better it reduces recoil, the better control you'll have over your shotgun. As a result, your shots will be more accurate, more precise, and in some cases more deadly. The Mossberg 500 is one of the most reliable shotguns ever used. If you want to add upgrades to the Mossberg you currently own, then one thing to do first is finding the best recoil pad. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Mossberg 500 Recoil Pads OUR TOP PICK: Limbsaver - Recoil Pad Pachmayr Decelerator Slip On Recoil Pad Recoil Eraser - Slip On Recoil Pad BEST BUDGET OPTION: LimbSaver Slip-On Recoil Pad Comparison Chart of the Best Mossberg "500 Recoil Pads" IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Limbsaver - Recoil Pad Made of Synthetic Material Fits on a Wide Variety of Shotguns Anti-Muzzle Jump Technology for Minimal Muzzle Jump View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews "Pachmayr Decelerator Slip" On Recoil Pad Easy to Slip-On Available in Either Black or Brown Best Mossberg 500 Recoil Pad for the Money "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Recoil Eraser - Slip On Recoil Pad Easy to Slip On One Size Fits All Gel Pad for Maximum Shock Absorption and Recoil Reduction View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option LimbSaver Slip-On Recoil Pad Slip-On Option Reduces Felt Recoil by 50 Percent Available in Sizes, Including for Hard-to-Fit Stocks View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a Recoil Pad and What Are They Used For? A recoil pad is attached to the buttstock of your shotgun. These are constructed out of materials like rubber, foam, leather, or other soft materials designed to help reduce the recoil of your Mossberg 500 shotgun. As you fire your Mossberg 500, your gun will kick back. At the same time, your muzzle may rise. Source If you do not have firm control over your shotgun, the shot you fired won’t be able to hit its mark. A recoil pad is designed to give you total control over your shotgun. At the same time, it will considerably reduce the amount of initial recoil it produces with every shot you fire. As a result, you will be able to shoot straight and accurately without having to deal with a moving muzzle. The recoil pads are also designed to absorb the shock that is associated with recoil. Are Recoil Pads Important While Shooting? The short answer: yes. The long answer? You’ll need to reduce as much recoil as possible when it comes to using your Mossberg 500 if you want to fire off more precise and accurate shots. Meanwhile, some of the accessories you might have attached to your Mossberg 500 (if any) might not be able to withstand a good amount of shock that comes from recoil. While it is important to invest in quality accessories that can handle recoil shock, being able to reduce it as much as possible is something you might want to consider. Aspects to Consider Before Buying a Recoil Pad You can’t simply just buy a recoil pad right off the shelf. At the same time, you can’t just click the “add to cart” button at the first recoil pad you see. Finding the best recoil pad that fits you takes a bit of time and a little detective work before making a decision. There are a few aspects that will be factored into your buying process. Here are some of those aspects that past buyers have considered when they bought their recoil pads Material First and foremost, we always take a look at the overall quality of the recoil pad we’re looking for. Obviously, we’ll be looking for one that is excellent in quality. Furthermore, we would often look for the material that the recoil pad is made from. The reason being is because some materials are better able to absorb and reduce shock than others constructed from other materials. At the same time, the price a pad is going for will likely depend on the material that it is made from. Limbsaver - Recoil Pad is made of synthetic material. Price There are two kinds of Mossberg owners: those who have some money to work with and those who are on a budget. Price is a factor that mostly applies to the latter. It’s possible to find a good recoil pad for a reasonable price. Once again, the quality of the product you choose must factor into your decision. A smart buyer would find the best quality recoil pad with a price tag that doesn’t drain their bank account. Sometimes, if it’s ridiculously low priced, there’s usually a reason why. Dirt cheap can also mean dirt poor in quality. Installation The installation process for almost all of these recoil pads is relatively easy. This means that you won’t need to rely on tools or professional gunsmithing skills in order to add this type of product to your Mossberg 500. Most recoil pads are either snap-ons or slip-ons. Furthermore, some of them are interchangeable and have the ability to fit a wide variety of shotguns. Quick Take - The Best Mossberg 500 Recoil Pads These are our recommendations for the best Mossberg 500 recoil pads: Limbsaver - Recoil Pad Pachmayr Decelerator Slip On Recoil Pad Recoil Eraser - Slip On Recoil Pad Review of the Best Mossberg 500 Recoil Pads The following are five of the Mossberg 500 recoil pads that we believe are the best available on the market. Each one is best for a Mossberg user but has different preferences and personal needs. At the same time, there are some that are considered reasonably priced and will fit most budgets. Please read through each recoil pad review carefully as there may be a unique feature or two that might interest you. If you believe that the recoil pad you like is worth the investment, you should consider doing further research before making a decision. With that said, let's begin our list of best recoil pads: ​Best Overall: Limbsaver - Recoil Pad CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Very Durable Very Easy to Install Reduction of Recoil is Noticeable When Installed. Cons May Need Some Additional Fitting on Some Shotguns First on the docket is the Limbsaver recoil pad. If you're looking for an item designed to fire a wide variety of shotguns including your Mossberg 500, then the Limbsaver could be the right choice for you to choose as your own. This product is not only designed to reduce a good amount of recoil, but it is also designed to keep muzzle jump to a minimum. To be more specific, this is designed to reduce up to 70% of recoil. These are easy to install and are designed to take on any kind of weather that nature can muster up. Made from synthetic materials, it is proven to stand up against the elements and the shock that is produced from recoil. What more can you ask for in a pad like this? If you’re looking for a recoil pad that can take a beating and absorb shock like nothing else, the Limbsaver might be the one worth investing in. Bottom Line The Limbsaver is, without a doubt, one of the best factory replacement Mossberg recoil pads.  However, some users had to have some additional fitting done on their shotgun. Despite this being easy to install for most, sometimes this happens. Aside from that, the thing that impressed us about this is the amount of recoil that was reduced once installed. It’s considerably reduced or even non-existent. The same can be said about the muzzle jump. If you’re looking for a recoil pad that will allow you total control over your shotgun with little to almost no recoil, this might be the recoil pad that deserves a further look. Runner-up: ​ Pachmayr Decelerator Slip On Recoil Pad CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Reduces Recoil By a Lot Fits a Wide Variety of Shotguns Mounts Quickly Without Any Snagging Cons Some Users Have Complained About the Pad Moving a Bit After Every Shot Some Have Complained That the Pad is a Little Thick and Causes the Reach to be Extended "Some Users Have" Stated That While it Absorbs a Good Amount of Recoil, it Doesn’t Do as Good as a Job as the Limbsaver Of course, we always look out for the budget Mossberg owners. And it’s no secret that they too want a recoil pad that will work effectively with their shotgun. So, we set out to find one that was best for those on a budget. The best of the budget bunch, we believe, is the Pachmayr Decelerator Slip-On Recoil Pad. Like the name says, this is a recoil pad that you can easily slip onto the buttstock of your Mossberg shotgun . If you’re looking for excellent replacement for recoil pads that are harder than a rock, this might be the product you’re looking for. This is available in black or brown. So, find a color that will best fit your Mossberg's buttstock. Even if you don't hold aesthetics to a high standard, be sure to find the one that will best blend in with your shotgun. Since this a slip on, you know that this is easy to install. No gunsmithing skills required. This is made from a synthetic material that is designed to absorb a good deal of shock and reduce recoil. Bottom Line For a budget option, the Pachmayr does a good job reducing both recoil and muzzle jump. This might give the Limbsaver a run for its money. Since this is a slip on, it’s convenient for those who want to add it onto their shotgun and be good to go. No matter what shotgun you have, this recoil pad will likely work the way it’s intended. If you get this recoil pad and like it, don’t hesitate to get another one for a different shotgun. Best for the Money: Recoil Eraser - Slip On Recoil Pad CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros No Muzzle Jump Very Easy to Install Much Softer on the Shoulders When There is Little Recoil Cons "Some Have Complained" About it Being Too Small for Their Shotguns Some Users Have Complained the Fabric Tends to Fray After a Few Hundred Shots With a name like the Recoil Eraser, it has to be good, right? Well, let's see if it lives up to the name. For one, this is a slip-on option. Installation is a breeze and no tools are needed. Equipped in this pad is a gel pad that is designed to absorb the maximum amount of shock that is produced from recoil. Like rubber, gel can take on a lot of shock time and time again. Plus, this pad, in particular, can also reduce recoil by 70% or more. If you're looking for a great product that is easy to install and will bring recoil almost down to a zero, then the Recoil Eraser might be the right choice for your Mossberg 500. Of course, this is one-size-fits-all, so expect this to fit any kind of rifle or shotgun that you own. Bottom Line The Recoil Eraser does indeed live up to the name. The fact that it’s easy to slip on and the innovative gel material used to absorb the shock and reduce recoil are the two major things that stick out in our minds as the best features. This is yet another recoil pad that might challenge the Limbsaver (and other pads that can reduce a lot of recoil). If you’re looking for an upgrade for your current, unimpressive recoil pad, the Recoil Eraser might be a very worthy upgrade for your Mossberg 500. 4. LimbSaver Slip-On Recoil Pad CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to Install Will Fit Most Mossberg 500 Shotguns Corrects Other Problems Like Bad Eye Relief. This is Due to its Ability to Reduce Recoil Cons Might Wiggle a Bit After Each Shot The Fit May Not Be Perfect for Some Buttstocks May Be Susceptible to Tears After Hundreds of Shots Fired For our next product review, we return to the Limbsaver brand. This is an easy to install, slip-on recoil pad that is designed to reduce felt recoil up to 50 percent. Most importantly, it's designed to help you fire more accurate follow-up shots. Of course, a reduced amount of recoil does equal more accurate shots. If you're looking for a product that is designed for hard-to-fit shotgun stocks, then the Limbsaver could be the choice for you. These are available in a wide variety of sizes that can accommodate any shotgun buttstock. Before purchasing this, you should take proper measurements of your Mossberg stock so you can be able to purchase the correct size. Bottom Line While it doesn't reduce as much recoil as some of our other offerings, this still does a good job reducing a considerable amount of recoil. If you don't mind a little bit of recoil, like a subdued amount, you'll probably like this product. You'll still have better control over your shotgun and be able to hit your follow up shots with dead-on accuracy. This might be the best recoil pad you've used in the field or at the range. If you hold accuracy to a high standard, then you might want to consider this version of the Limbsaver 5. Mossberg Flex Recoil Pad 1.50" CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to Install and Uninstall. Absorbs a Great Deal of Shock Interchangeable With Mossberg Shotguns Cons None Last, but not least on our list of recoil pads is the "Mossberg Flex Recoil" Pad. Right out of the gate, you'll know that this will fit pretty much every Mossberg 500 or 590 shotgun. The reason why is that it's from the Mossberg brand itself. This is an interchangeable recoil pad, which means you'll have the ability to use this on one shotgun and then use it on another when you need it. The attachment and detachment process is easy to do. Since the installation process will be a cinch, you won't need tools or the services of a professional blacksmith. In order to remove it, all you have to do is press a button. This recoil pad is measured at an inch-and-a-half and is made from rubber. Rubber is considered to be one of the best materials with the ability to absorb shock from recoil. Likewise, this pad will also be more comfortable on your shoulders as it does its job to reduce the recoil on your Mossberg 500 or 590. If you’re looking for a great factory replacement that can stand the test of time and handle a great deal of recoil, the Mossberg Flex Recoil Pad is exactly what you might need. Bottom Line This factory replacement recoil pad has proven itself to be worthy of our list for a few good reasons. It's interchangeable and has the ability to easily attach to Mossberg 500 and 590 shotguns. Whether it can be easily attached to older models remains to be seen. At the same time, Mossberg knows that their shotguns produce a good deal of recoil. So, they chose the best material designed to absorb as much shock as possible. Leave it to good ol' rubber to get the job done. With that said, if you're looking for something that's easy to use, easy to install, and reliable no matter which shotgun you use, get the Mossberg Flex Recoil Pad. How to Install a Recoil Pad on a Shotgun If it’s so easy to install a recoil pad on a shotgun, how come we’re showing you step-by-step instructions? Well, for some products, they may be a challenge to fit on your Mossberg’s buttstock. These pertain to those that are not slip-ons. Here’s how you install a recoil pad: First, mark the center of the heel and toe and draw a nice straight line from the heel to the toe. Drill the holes where the heel and toe marks are to the size of the pad’s connectors. Add on the recoil pad. If it appears oversized, continue reading. Using a sharp scribe, trace around the butt of the stock. Remove the pad and place it upside down on a recoil pad fixture. Set the angle of the comb and set and adjust the first screw. Then set the angle of the toe line. Go to the sander and grind the excess material off your pad. Grind the toe line of the pad and go halfway up the sides. Grind away the scribe line you drew outside the stock. Slowly grind at the arc. Adjust the fixture and grind the heel. Once all the excess is gone, install the pad on your stock. Conclusion Finding the best Mossberg 500 recoil pad is easy if you know what to look for. A good product will do its job in reducing recoil and muzzle jump. So be sure to find one that fits your personal preferences, needs, and budget. Remember, you can also find one that is easy to install if you’re not up to using tools and doing any additional fitting. No matter which of the five recoil pads you choose from this list, you’ll be able to enjoy a reduced amount of recoil for your Mossberg and land the shots accurately wherever you aim. Find one for your shotgun today and give it a go.

Concealed Carry: Inside the Waistband

Concealed Carry: Inside the Waistband

When considering concealed carry for handguns, there are several options to consider for how to holster that self defense tool. In this article series, I’ll introduce some of the more common methods with some of their associated advantages and disadvantages beginning with in-the-waistband holsters. Overview Advantages : fits many different styles of pistols, large and small, highly concealable style, requires least amount of wardrobe adjustment to accommodate. Disadvantages : draw is less accessible than outside-the-waistband, not an option with a dress or skirt or bottom with an elastic waistband. Detailed View IWB concealed carry holsters are often composed of leather, nylon (or other fabric), Kydex , or a hybrid of kydex and leather. Leather is comfortable against the skin, and can be dried to fit a specific firearm, or simply a style of firearm. Nylon/fabric holsters are affordable, comfortable, and is easy to fit a variety of different types of firearms. Kydex provides excellent retention (some kydex holsters are retention-adjustable) and can be custom fit for specific firearm types, or produced to fit a style of handgun. IWB carry offers a highly concealable option that fits most body types for many situations and clothing (as long as that outfit includes belted bottoms). Some examples include Crossbreed (a leather/kydex hybrid), Uncle Mike’s (adjustable-retention kydex), or DeSantis (leather), among many others. There are also many custom holster makers that can tailor fit a concealed carry holster to suit a specific firearm and individual body specs – for a price. A problem females, more so than males, encounter with this style of holster has to deal with fashion and the advent of slim, low-rise jeans. Holsters designed to wear within the waistband, by definition, must fit on the inside of one’s pants. For individuals with tight-fitting bottoms, these holsters are more likely to print. One thing that can help this is by purchasing one size larger than usual to make room for the holster. Another issue with low-rise jeans is that, because they sit lower on the waist than other pant styles, there is less room to hide the holster (from top to bottom). It may fit comfortably while upright, but, in the seated position, even with a belted holster, there is a tendency for the holster to pop out of the waistband, sometimes entirely. In this reviewer’s experience, this is more of a problem with smaller pistols because they sit closer to top of the waistband. Wearing pants with a higher waist, or carrying a larger pistol minimizes this risk, although, with a larger pistol, concealing printing is more of a challenge. When considering concealed carry IWB holsters for women, the female form must also be taken into account: we have curves. The majority of holsters this reviewer has come across were not designed with the shape of a female’s hip, waist, and back in mind. The holsters are often too straight in these areas and so do not sit as snug or secure. Leather holsters, or hybrids with a leather backing have an advantage in this realm because, over time, the leather softens and begins to fit to the body. Because of the flexibility of the material, fabric holsters present less of this issue with fit, however, they often don’t have the same kind of retention the other options do. Kydex is the least form-fitting of the four holster types introduced in this article, but it has the greatest retention. Carrying IWB may be an easy way to concealed carry a firearm, but females in particular would be advised to consider how a particular holster will suit their clothing. Most pants will accommodate the extra bulk of a holstered pistol, as long as there’s enough space in the waistband, and the wearer uses a belt to slip through the holster to help disperse the pistol’s weight. However, there are some materials, namely leather and nylon, that are better suited to fit the female form. Choice of pant style in relation to gun size can also impact how successfully a holster can be concealed. Overall, it is hard to match the convenience of an IWB concealed carry holster for ease of concealment and fit for a wide degree of firearms. Ultimately, though, only you can decide what will suit your concealed carry needs best. How do you concealed carry?

Vortex Sparc vs Strikefire — Which Is Better? (ANSWERED) Photo by Jeff Eaton / CC BY It’s only appropriate that the two optics that make Vortex a name in the tactical market should face off against each other. Vortex became a household brand for many shooters due to the fame of the Sparc and Strikefire. Both fill a niche of a quality red dot at an affordable price. In a world of pricey Aimpoints, the Strikefire and Sparc proved that affordable and cheap were two different categories of optics. In all showdown of the Vortex Sparc vs Strikefire , the results can be subjective, but I will strive to show you the differences between the optics and point out where one is useful and which is not. Vortex Sparc vs Strikefire — What They Have in Common Vortex Optics Strikefire II Red Dot Sight - 4 MOA Red/Green Dot with Vortex Hat Price: Price as of 08/13/2020 23:50 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Vortex Optics SPARC Red Dot Sight Gen I - 2 MOA Dot (SPC-AR1) Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 02:02 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. First off, they are both red dot optics. Both are 1-power optics and are designed for close range shooting. Both are backed by the same Vortex VIP lifetime warranty, and both are suited for modern carbines. When it comes to price, it’s basically the same and should not be a factor. Both dots are similar in quality and are both overall excellent options.. Both optics are waterproof, not just water-resistant, but completely submersible. Both optics are nitrogen-purged for fog-free performance and are also shock proof. Vortex Sparc vs Strikefire — Reticles Both are considered red dot scopes, but that’s a catch-all term for optics like this, and often the dot might not be red at all. The Strikefire ( see full specs ) actually has two options for reticles. The first is a single red dot that has a super bright option. The next is the ability to swap between red or green reticles but is not as bright as the standard red. The additional of a green reticle allows the user to use the dot against a wider variety of background surfaces, and green also generally creates less eye strain. The Sparc, on the other hand, only has the option for a red dot. The optics also differ in reticle size. The Strikefire is a larger more eye catching 4 MOA, and the Sparc ( see full specs ) has a smaller, more precise 2 MOA. This is one of those choices the end user will have to make for themselves. Both optics feature ten different brightness levels with the Strikefire having the edge in brightness. Vortex Sparc vs Strikefire — Size However, the biggest difference between the two red dots is external. The Strikefire and Sparc are quite different in size. The Strikefire is a 30mm tube and objective lens. The Strikefire is also longer to allow the mounting of a cantilever. The Strikefire actually comes with a cantilever that will allow you to co-witness with standard height AR sights. The optic is 5.6 inches long and about an inch and a half in height. The Sparc is more of a micro-optic. With 22mm objective lens and a compact frame, the little optic doesn’t have room for any kind of mounting system. The small optic mounts with a lower Picatinny/Weaver adapter. The Sparc is 3.1 inches long and only 1.1 inches high. There isn’t a significant weight difference, but it is worth mentioning that the Strikefire weighs 7.2 ounces without the cantilever mount. The Sparc weighs 5.9 ounces with a mount. This isn’t a considerable difference on a rifle, but could be for other weapons. AR Red Dot: Vortex Sparc II First Shots Watch this video on YouTube

Red Rifleman Vol 4: The Palmetto State Armory MOEkov Review! Looserounds.com

When you’re so sad that your part kits from the motherland are running out… Cheer up, Palmetto State Armory has you covered. American Made AK is no longer a dirty word. Check out the MOEkov Review here at www.LooseRounds.com! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

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